Reviving the lost art of earth-based construction

 

Clayhands works with individuals, organizations and municipalities in small rural towns in South America beginning in the Andes Mountain region of Colombia to revive the art of earth BASED construction.

 
 

About

Background: Clayhands started with emerald dealers, miners and exporters wanting to give back to Colombia’s rural population. We see it growing and fulfilling a basic need; actually a quite urgent need. We hope you will join us.

Since 5 years ago the price of cement in Colombia has more than doubled. At the same time, Colombia has many displaced populations (ranking 2nd in the world for displaced people, after Syria) from the civil war. The Mayors of Borbur, Maripi and Muzo, all localities in the Colombian emerald mining region, have spoken to me about the need to address unemployment and lack of housing in their municipalities. 

 

Many projects await us in the municipality of Borbur. Central to the remote and semi-tropical emerald mining region in the Andes Mountains of Colombia, an abandoned adobe brick factory needs to be revitalized. Locals cannot depend only on the emerald mines for employment and my conversations with the mayors of several towns in the region reveal that employment is their main concern.

Many projects await us in the municipality of Borbur. Central to the remote and semi-tropical emerald mining region in the Andes Mountains of Colombia, an abandoned adobe brick factory needs to be revitalized. Locals cannot depend only on the emerald mines for employment and my conversations with the mayors of several towns in the region reveal that employment is their main concern.

Take Action

We need partners who want to work with us and support projects that benefit the people in Colombia. The mayor of Borbur has land for us to build on, and people to involve. We have instructors ready and motivated, and we have a spacious location in Bogota from where to administer the project or projects. I have happily put money and time into this; I feel like this is my duty and joy (the words are from poet Rabindarath Tagore: “duty IS joy”) to make this happen.

 

We are currently working with another Foundation in Colombia; it is called Hogares Claret, a therapeutic community for addicts and homeless boys aged 9-17 directed by Catholic priest Gabriel Mejia. 

Before being returned back to society some of the boys at Hogares Claret can learn earth-building skills that will help them in their future careers.

Before being returned back to society some of the boys at Hogares Claret can learn earth-building skills that will help them in their future careers.